Preventing Amputations

Posted by Kahla Livelsberger in #YHSafetyTips, Jun 20, 2018

A few week's ago we talked about hand safety and how that is the most common injury in this industry. Most amputations are involving the fingers like we mention in our hand safety post. You can amputate your fingers, hands, arms, legs, toes, and other body parts many ways. This week we are going to go over how to safely do your job to prevent this from happening.

MACHINES THAT ARE AT HIGH-RISK FOR AMPUTATIONS
-Mechanical power presses
-Power press brakes
-Powered and non-powered conveyors
-Printing presses
-Roll-forming and roll-bending machines
-Food slicers
-Meat grinders
-Band saws
-Drill presses
-Milling machines
-Shears, grinders, and slitters
-Table and portable saws

These injuries also happen in the material handling industry when workers are using trash compactors, forklifts, and hand tools.


PARTS OF MACHINES THAT ARE A HAZARD TO YOUR BODY
Point of Operation - which is where the machine actually performs the work.
Power-Transmission Apparatuses - like pulleys, belts, couplings, chains, spindles, gears and anything else that will transmit energy.
Moving-Parts - anything that is moving while the machine is in use.


PREVENTING AMPUTATIONS
Be sure that your workers take safety courses on your specific job or machine you are working with.

Guards - these are to block body parts from accessing the hazardous parts of the machine
Devices - these prevents contact with any of the points of operation


PINCH POINTS OF THE MACHINES
Rotating — circular movement of the couplings, cams, clutches, flywheels, and spindles as well as shaft ends and rotating collars.
Shearing — the movement of a knife during metal trimming.
Punching — this is a motion when a machine moves a slide to stamp or other material.
Transversing — movement that happens in a straight, continuous line
Cutting — action generated during sawing, boring, milling, drilling, slicing, and slitting.
Bending — an action that happens when power is applied to a slide to draw or form metal or other material.

It is your management team's responsibility to be sure the machines are safeguarded. Usually, the machines are equipped with safety features.

If you haven't read last week's post on chainsaw safety, read it here.

Resources: https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/amputation-factsheet.pdf
(First Image) https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghack/6990099383
(Second Image) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cebit_1_13_(8541714934).jpg

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