#YHSafetyTips - Guardrails

Posted by Kahla Livelsberger in #YHSafetyTips, Jan 18, 2017

Guardrails are an extremely important safety feature to have in your facility. They help to protect almost anything including your employees. They can also be used in any area of your warehouse to protecting walls from damage, creating hand rails for employees that prevent dangerous fall accidents, and protecting equipment from forklift damage.

When workers are exposed to areas that have a 6 feet drop or more, OSHA requires guardrails around the area to protect workers from a fall. Guardrails must also be able to withstand at least 200 lbs. of force. A guardrail that develops a rough edge must be replaced. The edge could possibly snag clothing or puncture the skin, which is a safety hazard.

Areas in your facility that should be guarded:
Conveyor Perimeter
Spiral Conveyor
Staircases
Machines
Electrical Panels
First Aid Stations
Restrooms
Loading Docks
Rack Isles

Protecting your investments:
After you protect your workers, you should consider protecting your long-term investments. These can be items such as cantilever racking, mezzanines, or even glass walls.

Our guardrails are made to withstand up to 10,000 lbs. of force at up to 4 MPH. Do you have any equipment in your facility that needs protected? With many different options available including column protectors, wall corner protectors, rack guards, and more we can protect anything in your facility! Find out more about the guardrails we sell by visiting our guardrails product page or call a service representative today for more information (800) 846-1224.

Check back next week when we discuss Online Safety! Did you miss last week's post on Aerial Lifts? If so, click here to read it.

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